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The Fat Artist and Other Stories
by Benjamin Hale
he Revolutionist
by Robert Tucker
Status Quo
by Mark Rosendorf
Nightfall Berlin
by Jack Grimwood
Fire and Fury
by Michael Wolff
Siding with Plato
by Michelle Manning
Ava XOX
by Carol Weston
Lincoln in the Bardo
by George Saunders
The Golden Dawn
by Billy Wong
She’s Like a Rainbow
by Eileen Colucci
Treats
by Lara Williams
Ramses the Damned: The Passion of Cleopatra
by Anne Rice & Christopher Rice
Yesterday's Kin
by Nancy Kress
The Blackbird Singularity
by Matt Wilven
Remembering the Ladies
by Ann Covell
The Not Knowing
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Halo: New Blood
by Matt Forbeck
Never Let You Go
by Erin Healy
The Worst Man on Mars
by Mark Roman & Corben Duke
The Mistake I Made
by Paula Daly
Normal
by Warren Ellis
Bleeding Hearts
by Josh Aterovis
The Sator Square
by Geoff Cook
Vic Challenger 6: Event
by Jerry Gill
Charming but Insane
by Sue Limb
Klaus
by Allan Massie
A Kind Man
by Susan Hill
Nemesis
by Brendan Reichs
1066 What Fates Impose
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Small Steps
by Louis Sachar
Unbound
by R.C. Butler
School of Velocity
by Eric Beck Rubin
Frenzy
by Glenn Lazar Roberts
Forgotten Reflections
by Young-Im Lee
Justice Mirror
by Simon Hall
The Ascent of Gravity
by Marcus Chown.
Savage Lane
by Jason Starr
The Eyes Behold Tomorrow by Ken Hart
Hark! A Shark
by Bonnie Worth
All the Light We Cannot See
by Anthony Doerr
Lex Talionis
by R. S. A. Garcia
A Brooklyn Rose
by Suzanna Lonchar
Blood on Snow
by Jo Nesbo
The TV Detective
by Simon Hall
The Things We Learn When We're Dead
by Charlie Laidlaw
Sunshine
by Robin McKinley
Knots and Crosses
by Ian Rankin
Europa Journal
by Jack Castle
Simon & Company: Flea Market Mice
by Mary H Wright
The Cellist of Sarajevo
by Steven Galloway
Cell 7
by Kerry Drewery
Even Dogs in the Wild
by Ian Rankin
Tesseracts Nineteen: Superhero Universe
by Claude Lalumiere and Mark Shainblum
Safe at Home
by C. Dennis Moore
The Recruit
by Robert Muchamore
The Retribution
by Val McDermid
The Last Autumn
by Ophelia Juliet
Whispers through a Megaphone
by Rachel Elliott
Heartstrings
by Marilyn Boone
The Surgeon
by Tess Gerritsen
Black Glass
by John Shirley
Guilt
by Emma Kaufmann
Freak the Mighty
by Rodman Philbrick
A Cold Death
by Antonio Manzini
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Latest Book Reviews...
Review - TheForever WarThe Forever War
by Joe Haldeman

Average Review Rating Average Rating [8/10] (1 Review)
David has sent in a review for The Forever War by Joe Haldeman. The Earth's leaders have drawn a line in the interstellar sand--despite the fact that the fierce alien enemy they would oppose is inscrutable, unconquerable, and very far away. A reluctant conscript drafted into an elite Military unit, Private William Mandella has been propelled through space and time to fight in the distant thousand-year conflict; to perform his duties and do whatever it takes to survive the ordeal and return home. But "home" may be even more terrifying than battle, because, thanks to the time dilation caused by space travel, Mandella is aging months while the Earth he left behind is aging centuries. One of the very best must-read Science Fiction novels of all time... more»»
David 30th June 2018 [8/10]
Review - The Transference Engine   The Transference Engine
by Julia Verne St. John
Average Review Rating Average Rating [8/10] (1 Review)
Paul has sent in a review for The Transference Engine by Julia Verne St. John. A fantastical steampunk novel of magic and machines set in an alternate 1830s London Madame Magdala has reinvented herself many times, trying to escape Lord Byron's revenge. She destroyed the Transference Engine Byron hoped to use to transfer his soul into a more perfect body and perpetuate his life eternally. A fanatical cult of necromancers continues Byron's mission to force Magdala and Byron's only legitimate child--Ada Lovelace--to rebuild the machine and bring Byron back. Magdala now bills herself as the bastard daughter of a Gypsy King. She runs a fashionable London coffee salon and reading room while living a flamboyant lifestyle at the edge of polite society. Behind the scenes, she and Ada Byron King, Countess of Lovelace, use the massive library stored at the Bookview Cafe to track political and mercantile activity around the world. They watch to make certain the cult of necromancy surrounding Lord Byron, the poet king who worshipped death, cannot bring him back to life... more»»
Paul Lappen 30th June 2018 [8/10]
Review - Crime Fiction – A Very Short Introduction Crime Fiction – A Very Short Introduction
by Richard Bradford

Average Review Rating Average Rating [8/10] (1 Review)
Ben Macnair has sent in a review for Crime Fiction – A Very Short Introduction by Richard Bradford. rime fiction has been one of the most popular genres since the 19th century, but has roots in works as varied as Sophocles, Herodotus, and Shakespeare. In this Very Short Introduction Richard Bradford explores the history of the genre, by considering the various definitions of 'crime fiction' and looking at how it has developed over time. Discussing the popularity of crime fiction worldwide and its various styles; the role that gender plays within the genre; spy fiction, and legal dramas and thrillers; he explores how the crime novel was shaped by the work of British and American authors in the 18th and 19th centuries. Highlighting the works of notorious authors such as Edgar Allan Poe, Conan Doyle, Agatha Christie, and Raymond Chandler - to name but a few - he considers the role of the crime novel in modern popular culture and asks whether we can, and whether we should, consider crime fiction serious 'literature'... more»»
Ben Macnair 30th June 2018 [8/10]
Review - Danny and Life on Bluff Point: Cougar Threat Danny and Life on Bluff Point: Cougar Threat
by Mary Ellen Lee

Average Review Rating Average Rating [9/10] (1 Review)
Molly has sent in a review for Danny and Life on Bluff Point: Cougar Threat by Mary Ellen Lee. Ten-year-old Danny yearns for responsibility and a chance to prove his skills. He desperately wants to pitch in and ease the difficulties that pioneer life presents to his family as they manage their large fruit and livestock farm in 1894.Life on the farm is hard, though, and Danny, with his unusually small stature, struggles to gain strength to help his father and the hired hands. After all, there are difficult chores to tackle: chopping and hauling wood, caring for the workhorses, slopping the pigs, and hunting food. With sheer determination, Danny takes on everything his father allows, working hard to help ensure his family's well-being. What Danny comes to realize, though, is that it's not a person's size that counts. When he confronts a rogue cougar, runaway horses, and a classroom bully, Danny must use his wits, sensibilities, and instincts to prevail... more»»
Molly Martin 30th June 2018 [9/10]
Review - Danny and Life on Bluff Point: Lost in the DarkDanny and Life on Bluff Point: Lost in the Dark
by Mary Ellen Lee

Average Review Rating Average Rating [9/10] (1 Review)
Molly has sent in a review for Danny and Life on Bluff Point: Lost in the Dark by Mary Ellen Lee. The exciting third book in this charming series of historical novels for children sees the adventures continue for ten-year-old Danny in 1890s rural upstate New York. It's the winter of 1895 in Bluff Point, New York, and though chores and school continue, Danny manages to make time for fun. He and his family enjoy all that living in the country has to offer-ice skating, fishing, sledding, and even a winter party with friends and neighbours. Pa and Uncle Henry race their spirited teams and sleighs along the Ridge Road, and Danny is given his own small iceboat, one to be shared with Cousin Jay. One day while out on the iceboat, Danny fails to pay attention to where he is and how far out onto the lake he's gone. He spends a chilly, windless night alone on the ice of Keuka Lake. Cold and frightened, Danny chooses the wrong direction in the moonless night and walks further away from home. Can Danny find his way back before the winter wind turns even colder... more»»
Molly Martin 30th June 2018 [9/10]
Review - Danny and Life on Bluff Point: The Man on the TrainDanny and Life on Bluff Point: The Man on the Train
by Mary Ellen Lee

Average Review Rating Average Rating [9/10] (1 Review)
Molly has sent in a review for Danny and Life on Bluff Point: The Man on the Train by Mary Ellen Lee, the fourth in a series of historical novels for children. It is now March of 1895 and the last iceboating of the winter is done with a family trip across Keuka Lake to the community of Crosby. Danny has his sister Mary with him and must carefully control his iceboat in a very strong wind. Great Grandma Baker tells the children about her family's trip from Rensselaer County to Orleans County on the Erie Canal in 1858. Grandma and Grandpa Scott leave Bluff Point and move to Gorham with the help of the Lee family. The ride on the steam cars is fun for all until Mary is trapped in the livestock car by an evil man. Danny helps with the rescue. Danny learns when it is time to stand up for himself and his loved ones... more»»
Molly Martin 30th June 2018 [9/10]
Review - Glass HousesGlass Houses
by Jackie Buxton

Average Review Rating Average Rating [9/10] (1 Review)
Chrissi has reviewed Glass Houses by Jackie Buxton. 'When she sent that text, all our lives changed for ever...' Fifty-one-year-old Tori Williams' life implodes when she sends a text while driving on the M62 motorway and allegedly causes the horrific crash in which three people die. Public and press are baying for her blood, but Tori is no wallflower and refuses to buckle under their pressure or be a pariah in society. Instead, she sets about saving the nation. But can she save Etta, the woman who saved her life? Or will Etta's secret be her downfall? This incredibly topical and contemporary morality tale appeals across generations and will find favour with fans of authors such as Liane Moriarty, Marian Keyes and Kathryn Croft... more»»
Chrissi 31st March 2018 [9/10]
Review - The Bug Boys The Bug Boys
by Stewart Hoffman

Average Review Rating Average Rating [8/10] (1 Review)
Nigel has reviewed The Bug Boys by Stewart Hoffman. Who would have thought that eating a peanut butter sandwich and an apple would change your life? Let alone get you mixed up with an old alien research project, and transform you into the superheroes your village never needed. For two young South Yorkshire lads, Alex Adams and Ian Harris, it was a geeky comic book dream come true, but it wasn’t everything it was cracked up to be in the real world. They discover there are many layers between good and evil, and with great power, comes an embarrassing amount of gas... more»»
Nigel 31st March 2018 [8/10]
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